Factory supplied Stuffing box and shaft sleeves and FPL insert for Lithuania Factories

Factory supplied
 Stuffing box and shaft sleeves and FPL insert for Lithuania Factories

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  • (12 Feb 2012) SHOTLIST
    ++DUSK SHOTS++
    1. Wide travelling shot of pumping operation with oil tanker “Elba” next to Costa Concordia, hose in foreground
    2. Mid pan of pumping operation
    3. Set up shot of Sergio Ortelli, Mayor of Giglio Island
    3. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Sergio Ortelli, mayor of Giglio Island:
    “I am expecting that they will remove all the fuel, all of it, because that is the bigger risk we have, after that we can start talking about the implementation of safety measures for the ship, but we will talk about that in the future, now it is still to early.”
    4. Wide of Giglio port
    5. SOUNDBITE (Italian) No name given, local resident, vox pop:
    “The fear of pollution is big, that is the only thing we are scared of. The boat will be taken away at the right time, what is important is to remove the fuel. Fuel is the most scary thing for everybody here.”
    6. Wide of oil tanker next to Costa Concordia
    7. Wide of Bart Huizing, Smit salvage master, in Giglio port
    8. SOUNDBITE (English) Bart Huizing, salvage master, Dutch shipwreck salvage firm Smit:
    “This is the first fuel oil we have pumped this afternoon from the Costa Concordia. We expect the next five days to be good weather, and we will work 24 hours a day to pump out the fuel and we concentrate now on the forward part of the vessel, those are six tanks containing roughly 62, 65 per cent of the fuel and hopefully by the end of the week we will have the majority out of the fuel.”
    9. Mid of Huizing talking to journalist
    10. Various close of Costa Concordia
    11. Various of pumping operation
    STORYLINE
    Underwater pumping operations began on Sunday to remove some of the 500-thousand gallons of fuel aboard the Costa Concordia, officials said, nearly a month after the cruise ship ran aground off Tuscany.
    After nearly two weeks of delays because of rough seas and bad weather, the pumping got under way on the first of 15 tanks that are believed to hold around 84 percent of the fuel on board, Italy’s civil protection department said.
    Officials say it will take 28 consecutive days of pumping to empty the tanks.
    Dutch shipwreck salvage firm Smit is overseeing the operation, along with an Italian partner.
    The fuel extraction process involves fixing valves on the underwater fuel tanks, one on top, one on bottom.
    Hoses are attached to the valves and as the oil – which must be warmed to make it less gooey – is sucked out of the upper hose, sea water is pumped in to fill the vacuum via the lower hose.
    “We expect the next five days to be good weather, and we will work 24 hours a day to pump out the fuel,” said Bart Huizing, Smit’s salvage master.
    He said operations would initially focus on the six tanks in the front part of the ship where about 62-65 percent of the fuel is located.
    “Hopefully by the end of the week we will have the majority out,” he said in a TV interview with The Associated Press in Giglio.
    Ever since the Concordia ran aground January 13, fears have swirled about fuel leaks and resulting contamination of the pristine waters off the tiny island of Giglio, which form part of a protected sanctuary for dolphins, whales and porpoises.
    There have been no reports of any serious leaks.
    The Concordia slammed into a reef off Giglio after the captain deviated from the ship’s planned course in an apparent stunt.
    Passengers have said the captain then delayed sounding the evacuation alarm until the ship had capsized so much that lifeboats on one side couldn’t be lowered.
    About 4,200 passengers and crew escaped, but 17 bodies have been found and another 15 people remain missing and presumed dead.
    He has said the reef wasn’t marked on his nautical charts.

    You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ebcca81a1469482298aa9c78595b2332
    Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork



    Change a Foot Valve on a Shallow Well

    The customer service reprersentative explained very detailed, service attitude is very good, reply is very timely and comprehensive, a happy communication! We hope to have a opportunity to cooperate.







    5 Stars By Miguel 2015-11-29 15:24
    Products and services are very good, our leader is very satisfied with this procurement, it is better than we expected,


    5 Stars By Catherine 2016-7-13 16:09