2017 New Style 12/10 G-GH Gravel Sand Pump for Comoros Factories

2017 New Style
 12/10 G-GH Gravel Sand Pump  for Comoros Factories

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Product Features Type G(orGH) gravel pumps are designed for continuously handling the most difficult high abrasive slurries which contain too big solids to be pumped by a common pump. They are suitable for delivering slurries in Mining, Explosive sludge in metal melting, Dredging in dredger and river course, and other fields. Type GH are high head pumps. Construction                          Construction of this pump is of single casing connected by means of clamp bands and wide wet-passage. ...


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2017 New Style 12/10 G-GH Gravel Sand Pump for Comoros Factories Detail:

Product Features

Type G(orGH) gravel pumps are designed for continuously handling the most difficult high abrasive slurries which contain too big solids to be pumped by a common pump. They are suitable for delivering slurries in Mining, Explosive sludge in metal melting, Dredging in dredger and river course, and other fields. Type GH are high head pumps.

Construction                         

Construction of this pump is of single casing connected by means of clamp bands and wide wet-passage. The wet-parts are made of Ni_hard and high chromium abrasion-resistance alloys. The discharge direction of pump can be oriented in any direction of 360°. This type of pump possesses the advantages of easy installation and operation, good performance of NPSH and abrasion-resistance.

19_副本 

      1.Support                                                8. Discharge Joint Ring 

      2.Bearing Housing Assembly                    9. Discharge Flang

      3.Adapter Plate Clamp Band                    10. Door Clamp Band

      4.Volute Liner Seal                                  11. Cover Plate

      5.Frame Plate Liner Insert                        12. Intake joint ring

      6. Impeller                                               13. Intake flange

      7. Frame Plate / Bowl                              14. Adapter plate

Performance Chart

                  Pump   Model Allowable
Max. Power
(kw)
                                  Clear Water Performance  
 Capacity  Q  Head
  H   (m)
Speed
  n (r/min) 
Max.Eff.
(%)
  NPSH
(m)
 Impeller. Dia.  (mm)
      m3/h                  l/s           
6/4D-G 60 36-250 10-70 5-52 600-1400 58 2.5-3.5 378
8/6E-G 120 126-576 35-160 6-45 800-1400 60 3-4.5 378
10/8S-GH 560 216-936 60-260 8-52 500-1000 65 3-7.5 533
10/8S-G 560 180-1440 50-400 24-30 500-950 72 2.5-5 711
12/10G-G 600 360-1440 100-400 10-60 400-850 65 1.5-4.5 667
12/10G-GH 1200 288-2808 80-780 16-80 350-700 73 2.0-10.0 950
14/12G-G 1200 576-3024 160-840 8-70 300-700 68 2.0-8.0 864
16/14G-G 600 720-3600 200-1000 18-44 300-500 70 3.0-9.0 1016
16/14TU-G 1200 324-3600 90-1000 26-70 300-500 72 3.0-6.0 1270
18/16TU-G 1200 720-4320 200-1200 12-48 250-500 72 3.0-6.0 1067

Applications
The gravel pump is used for river course, reservoir desalting, coastal reclamation, stretching, deep-sea mining and tailing acquisition etc. Gravel pumps are designed for continuously handling the most difficult higher abrasive slurries which contain too big solids to be pumped by a common pump. They are suitable for delivering slurries in Mining, Explosive sludge in metal melting, Dredging in dredger and course of rivers, and other fields.


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2017 New Style
 12/10 G-GH Gravel Sand Pump  for Comoros Factories detail pictures


"Control the quality by the details, show the power by quality". Our enterprise has strived to establish a remarkably efficient and stable team team and explored an effective excellent control system for 2017 New Style 12/10 G-GH Gravel Sand Pump for Comoros Factories, The product will supply to all over the world, such as: Jordan , Berlin , Chile , We've got constructed strong and long co-operation relationship with an enormous quantity of companies within this business in Kenya and overseas. Immediate and professional after-sale service supplied by our consultant group has happy our buyers. Thorough Info and parameters from the merchandise will probably be sent for you for any thorough acknowledge. Free samples may be delivered and company check out to our corporation. n Kenya for negotiation is constantly welcome. Hope to get inquiries type you and construct a long-term co-operation partnership.


  • August 2014
    Injection dredging in progress near the Oil Dock between Llanthony and Hempsted bridges, prior to the arrival of masted vessels using the main dock for filming of the latest Johnny Depp film.
    Electric pumps which draw water from the adjoining River Severn also feed in enormous quantities of silt. Until recent years, bucket dredging and a convoy of mud boats removed the silt from the main dock on a very regular basis. Dredging is now on an “ad hoc” basis, using contractors and injection dredging equipment. The irrigated mud, in temporary suspension, is encouraged to flow north to Gloucester Lock which is left with paddles fully drawn and vast quantities of water flowing. Silt flows into the river channel which then flows past the pump inlets. The extent of the serious silt build up in the canal is clearly evident by how far the dredger has travelled south of Llanthony.
    In the last forty years, the river channel between Gloucester lock and Llanthony weir has silted significantly. This has noticeably reduced the speed of river flow here and along the Quay wall under normal river and rainfall conditions. The lack of maintenance in the last 50 years may well contribute to flood water not clearing as efficiently from Gloucester as it used to, and is probably being exacerbated by this form of dredging on the canal.
    Injection dredging of the half tidal section from the “Parting” (north of Gloucester) to Llanthony weir (where the river Severn becomes fully tidal) would be an effective way of improving Gloucester’s flood defences. The last serious floods were made far worse by the inability for the water channels to take water away between high tides.
    What would have been considered basic husbandry of rivers and drainage just fifty years ago is now hampered by money and lack of foresight.
    It is surprising that large Insurance companies do not become involved in the investment required.



    Used to pump water to the huge brine wells on the banks of the River Wyre. There’s four of these giant pumps within a half mile radius of each other, More video’s of the other locations to come

    Here’s the history –

    At Preesall, on the east bank of the River Wyre, a large area of land was given over to the mining of brine deposits. In 1889, the brine was sent in pipes across the river to the salt works at Burn Naze on the west bank.
    The brine mining was carried out by the Fleetwood Salt Co. Ltd, who leased 445 hectares at Preesall, obtained permission for the pipes across the river and leased a further 9 hectares of Burn Naze salt marsh for the works (see separate entry) .
    Before brine pumping came along, salt production by the evaporation of seawater had been a feature of the area around the mouth of the Wyre. Production of salt using this method was carried out in the 16th and 17th centuries. However, local methods moved on — to brine pumping, rock salt mining and then to the solution mining of modern times.
    Early brine mining commenced with a 170m deep borehole sunk at Fleetwood by the Royal Engineers in 1860. At Preesall, the Rev. Daniels and Daniel Elletson sank a 2.5m diameter half-brick lined shaft in 1875. Other shafts followed in the 1870s.
    Fleetwood Salt Company’s 1885 borehole was 186m deep and dug under the direction of E. Fiddler and A. Anderson. They pumped the brine to the surface using a ‘Bull’ engine. In 1889, the company gained a monopoly on the deposits and proceeded to carry out the scheme already described.
    A small reservoir was constructed on a hill as part of the preparations for pumping brine to Burn Naze. The pipe across the river was 250mm in diameter, designed by Charles H. Beloe and laid by T. Riley. Pumping commenced in 1890 at a rate of 13,640 litres per hour. The rate soon fell to 3,410 litres, which was insufficient for the salt works, so a method of pumping from one shaft to another and extracting the collected volume was devised.
    The first white salt was produced at Burn Naze on the 25th February 1890. The company was then sold to United Alkali Co. Ltd. In 1891, Stanley Bros. of Nuneaton built some 460m of 1.7m diameter tunnel at Preesall using a Stanley Heading Machine. That same year, more land at Burn Naze was purchased for the making of carbonate of soda and the Wyre pipeline was replaced with 183m of 100mm rubber hose (later replaced by wire armoured hose).
    In 1892-3, boreholes were sunk at the ends of the tunnels and lined with perforated steel pipes. Two 122m wells were dug by Charles Chapman & Sons, and a pumping installation by Hathorn Davey & Co. — capable of raising 204,500 litres per hour — was installed. In 1897, North Field pumping station was built to use the forcing system.
    Around 1902, Preesall Salt Works was built to the north of the salt marshes on the east bank of the river. A branch line to the Garstang & Knott End Railway was laid in 1912. An ammonia soda works started production in 1924, later becoming part of the ICI Hillhouse Works.

    Brine extraction at Stalmine

    In 1872, while searching for iron ore, a syndicate of men from Barrow struck a bed of rock salt about 400ft beneath the surface in Preesall. During the 20th century salt in the form of brine was used as a chemical feedstock by ICI Chemicals and Polymers at the Hillhouse site, Thornton for the production of chlorine, caustic soda and soda ash. Most of the more recent brine wells were drilled in Stalmine. Water was pumped down the brine well which dissolved the Halite (salt) bed and the salt extracted in the form of brine (solution mining). The last brine well to be drilled was BW 135 at the Heads, Stalmine in November 1991.

    This is a reputable company, they have a high level of business management, good quality product and service, every cooperation is assured and delighted!



    5 Stars By Victoria 2015-11-25 10:08
    High production efficiency and good product quality, fast delivery and completed after-sale protection, a right choice, a best choice.
















    5 Stars By Christian 2016-5-15 15:15